By William Wolf

MUSEUM OF MODERN ART RE-OPENS WITH LUXURIOUS NEW SPACE  Send This Review to a Friend

One striking aspect of the newly renovated, re-designed and re-opened Museum of Modern Art is the attractive, wide-open spaces in galleries located in the addition to MoMA. There is impressive wall space for paintings to be hung with comfortable distance between them, and that goes for the galleries with prominent floor installations as well.

The changes to MoMA have been made at a cost of $50 for the renovations and the higher amount of $400 million for the construction undertaken in newly added property. The gallery space has been increased by a third, now totaling 165,000 square feet.

The visitor returning will notice some changes even before entering. If one looks through the glass façade on West 53rd Street, one can see that the bookstore has been shifted to one level down.

The overall architecture by Diller Scofidio + Renfro in collaboration with Gensler will of course strike different observers in varied ways. The stress has been on giving the museum a contemporary fit in the New York City landscape. The interior main lobby also gives an impression of spaciousness, as do the passageways in the new structure.

The renowned Sculpture Garden remains a prime attraction easily visible, and the area containing the cinemas remains readily accessible.

It will take some time to wander about and visit all of the areas where art is displayed, and no matter how up-to-date and spacious the museum looks, its orientation toward content is ultimately how it will be judged.

One thing is already clear. MoMA is dedicated to providing more space to art from different parts of the world in addition to exhibiting the collection for which it has become famous over the years. In that sense it is keeping up with recognition of new achievements and a wider cultural diversity.

I leave that to the art critics who will be weighing various new exhibitions that are now and will be highlighted over the coming years. MoMA, which has been holding various previews for press and members, opens officially on October 21. An early visit is strongly recommended for New Yorkers and visitors alike. Admission: Adults $25, seniors $18, students $14, children 16 and under free. At 11 West 53rd Street. Phone: 212-708-9400. Posted October 13, 2019.

HAL PRINCE EXHIBIT AT LIBRARY REFLECTS HIS TRIUMPHS  Send This Review to a Friend

Theater lovers will find pleasure is viewing “In the Company of Hal Prince—Broadway Producer, Director, Collaborator,” the current exhibit at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center. There is plenty of time—the exhibit runs through March 31, 2020—to take in this event that reflects Prince’s extraordinary career. Prince died July 31 of this year at the age of 91.

As one strolls through the exhibit one sees evidence of Prince’s work, including posters of the vast number of shows which he produced and/or directed. There are photographs of him with those who wrote the music, lyrics and books for the hits that had long runs and stood out among the most popular Broadway productions of our time.

One can read the extensive correspondence Prince had with those in the theater world, some of them indicating disagreement, others laudatory and showing appreciation for his expertise and achievements.

One can trace Prince’s history in the theater, from his work with George Abbott early in his career to his later years when he remained the major figure in the Broadway theater world.

There are personal elements, such as his desk on display, complete with his telephone, as well as other memorabilia from his life and career. There are photos of those who played a large part in his work, such as Ruth Mitchell, who became an associate producer and an executive producer of Prince shows.

It is too bad Prince can’t see the exhibit that honors him, but you can and should not miss this important survey installed at the New York Public Library for Performing Arts, which you can find located between the Metropolitan Opera house and the Vivian Beaumont Theater at Lincoln Center. Reviewed October 5, 2019.

C-CAP BENEFIT ATTENDEES ENJOY TASTY DISHES FROM LEADING NEW YORK RESTAURANTS  Send This Review to a Friend

Those attending benefits of Careers through Culinary Arts Program (C-CAP) have the pleasure of knowing that they are helping students to pursue work opportunities in the food industry, as was the case in the latest event on Tuesday, February 26 at Pier 60, Cheslea Piers, where nearly $1 million was raised, according to C-CAP president Karen Brocius. But attendees also have the pleasure of tasty treats provided by chefs of leading New York restaurants at tables throughout the venue.

This event honored Eric Ripert, award-winning chef and co-owner of the renowned Le Bernardin, who lauded C-CAP’s work and said he wanted to share the C-CAP award with the organization’s students, whom he welcomed to his kitchen. The event chair and C-CAP board member was Brian Poplin, president and CEO of Elior North America, who called supporting C-CAP a good fit for his company. The event’s Chef Chair was Marcus Samuelsson, chef, author and chairman of the Marcus Samuelsson Group and also C-CAP board co-chair.

The printed program devoted a page to lauding Richard Grausman, founder and chairman emeritus of C-CAP, and award-winning educator and cook book author who previously represented France’s renowned Le Cordon Bleu in the United States. The program noted of Grausman: “As a result of his longtime leadership, C-CAP has helped train over 200,000 young people in the restaurant and hospitality industries and in the last 29 years has awarded over $56 million in scholarships to deserving high school students across the country.”

Those attending the 2019 benefit wended their way along the many tables spread throughout the venue and sampled as many dishes as stomachs could hold. I did my share, and naturally, while it was impossible to sample all the dishes and desserts, I had favorites among those I did try.

Restaurant Rice & Gold offered delicious mini Thai chicken sliders. Café Boulud served crispy duck rillette. The Polo Bar had Ralph’s corned beef sandwich. Estiatoro Milos served lavraki baked in sea salt.

I liked the Mangalitsa pork shoulder confit that was a specialty of the Tavern on the Green. I also liked the Michael’s octopus confit. At the Oceana table, one could enjoy cobia ceviche with Aguachile, orange and jicama.

One popular site was the table of Indian Accent, where I enjoyed the tamarind prawns, coconut barley, curry leaf gunpowder. Marcus Samuelsson , of course, is known for his Red Rooster and Marcus B & P. His dish of the night was the delicious salmon with bone broth aioli and crispy rice.

Maria Loi, long well known as a restaurateur, operates Loi Estiatorio, and she was personally on hand to supervise the servings of her tasty solomos mariantos: salmon tartare in phyllo cup with yogurt-dill sauce. Nobu 57 offered a tasty salmon sashimi over soba kernels with diced vegetables.

The treat at Park Avenue Spring was eggplant “meatball,” pine nuts, miso and kimchi. Almond excelled with smoked duck tacos. Porter House Bar and Grill served beef tenderloin salad. From Untitled at The Whitney: fingerling potato salad, trout roe, kombu, Granny Smith apple. Felidia had beets, apple, passion fruit, ricotta, pistachio “al pane.”

As for desserts, The Gotham Bar & Grll pleased with its vanilla parfait with fresh mango, passion fruit and coconut sorbet. I found very special Abigail Kersch’s “Fosters” ice cream sandwiches and pineapple passion mint julep. The black cocoa tiramisu offered by Don Angie was mouth-watering.

Sarabeth pleased with its rich triple-chocolate chocolate pudding generously topped with whipped cream that had to be plunged through to get to the chocolate. Gramercy Tavern treated the crowd to its passion fruit meringue pies.

All of the above skims the surface and just represents what I was able to sample. The full list of participating chefs and restaurants included:

Matthew Tiscornia, Abigail Kirsch

Jason Weiner and Alex Nieto, Almond

Markus Glocker, Bâtard

Floyd Cardoz, Bombay Bread

Daniel Boulud, Aaron Bludorn, Café Boulud

Bruno Bertin, Cuisine Solutions

Angie Rito, Scott Tacinelli, Don Angie

Ivy Stark, El Toro Blanco

Costas Spiliadis, Estiatorio Milos

Fortunato Nicotra, Felidia

Yvan Lemoine, Gitano, The Jungle Room

Alfred Portale, Gotham Bar and Grill

Michael Anthony, Gramercy Tavern

Miro Uskokovic, Gramercy Tavern

Manish Mehrotra, Indian Accent

Jonathan Waxman, JAMS

Maria Loi, Loi Estiatorio

Kyung Up Lim, Michael’s

Abram Bissell, The Modern

Matt Hoyle, Nobu 57

Bill Telepan, Oceana

Greg Baxtrom, Olmstead

Zene Flinn, Park Avenue Winter

Ashfer Biju, Perrine

Philippe Bertineau, The Polo Bar

Michael Lomonaco, Wayne Harley Brachman, Daniel Rutledge, Porter House

Marcus Samuelsson, Red Rooster Harlem and Marcus B&P

Jae Lee, Betty Peña*, Rice & Gold

Sarabeth Levine, Sarabeth’s

Jeff Miller, Storico, Constellation Culinary Group

Bill Peet, Tavern on the Green

Sherry Yard and Greg Power, The Tuck Room

Suzanne Cupps, Untitled

Michael White, Arthur Lee, Vaucluse

(For further information visit www.ccapinc.org and follow C-CAP on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook.

C-CAP TO HONOR NOTED CHEF AND RESTAURATEUR ERIC RIPERT AT COMING FOOD-TASTING BENEFIT  Send This Review to a Friend

It’s time again for one of New York’s most enjoyable benefit events, the annual food-tasting gathering to raise money for the non-profit Careers through Culinary Arts Program (C-CAP), dedicated to advancing the careers of underserved high school students in the field of culinary arts. This year’s honoree is Eric Ripert, noted chef and co-owner of the renowned New York restaurant Le Bernardin. Ripert will receive the 2019 C-CAP award, which is given to honor exceptional leadership and achievement within the food industry.

Some 40 of New York City’s outstanding chefs are participating, with tables featuring tastings of their restaurant specialties, and some 100 C-CAP students and alumni from high schools in New York and other cities assisting in the servings. As in the past, the event will be held at Pier Sixty, Chelsea Piers. The date in Tuesday, February 26, from 5:45 to 9.00 p.m. Those who have attended in previous years know the pleasure of wandering among the tables and tasting the wide array of food offered. It is a challenge to see how much a person can sample from all of the opportunities available. Wines are also served.

The 2019 event chair is Brian Poplin, President and CEO of Elior North America, lead sponsor of the benefit. Those participating include Chef Chair and C-CAP board Co-Chair Marcus Samuelsson and Michelin star chefs Abram Bisssell, Aaron Bludorn, Daniel Boulud, Markus Glocker, Alfred Portale and Michael White, as well as C-CAP alumni Yvan Lemoine from Gitano and The Jungle Room, and Betty Peña from Rice & Gold.

Over the years C-CAP has given out more than $53 million in scholarships awarded through culinary competitions. The organization was founded in 1990 by culinary educator and cookbook author Richard Grausman, now Chairman Emeritus.

“C-CAP changes lives by arming underserved high school students with the skills they need to succeed in the culinary arts,” says Marcus Samuelsson. “C-CAP helps thousand of students across the country through education and career readiness opportunities . As a chef and longtime supporter of C-CAP’s work, I have seen first-hand how this program benefits its remarkable students and the industry’s growing demand for skilled talent. C-CAP’s benefit makes a huge difference in the lives of so many students.”

Ripert, chosen as this year’s honoree, not only has achieved distinction as co-owner of Le Bernardin, but is Vice Chairman of City Harvest, which works to bring together New York’s top chefs and restaurateurs to raise funds and increase the quality and quantity of food donations to New York’s neediest. He has also mentored C-CAP students and alumni.

Ripert was born in Antibes, France. He moved to Andorra, the small country just over the Spanish border, as a child. His family instilled a passion for food in the young Ripert, and at the age of 15 he left home to attend culinary school in Perpignan. At 17, he moved to Paris and cooked at the legendary La Tour D’Argent before taking a position at the Michelin three-starred Jamin. After fulfilling his military service, Ripert returned to Jamin under Joël Robuchon to serve as chef poissonier.

In 1989, Ripert was given the opportunity to work under Jean-Louis Palladin as sous-chef at Jean Louis at the Watergate Hotel in Washington, D.C. Ripert moved to New York in 1991, working briefly as David Bouley’s sous-chef before Maguy and Gilbert Le Coze recruited him as chef for Le Bernardin. He is one of only a few chefs in America to consistently receive three Michelin stars and has been top-rated in the Zagat Survey over the last 10 years.

In September 2014, Ripert and Le Coze opened Aldo Sohm Wine Bar, named for their wine director Aldo Sohm. That same month, the two expanded Le Bernardin’s private dining offerings with Le Bernardin Privé, a space above Aldo Sohm Wine Bar that can accommodate a range of events. In addition, Ripert partnered with the Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company to open Blue in Grand Cayman, the Caribbean’s only AAA 5 Diamond restaurant.

VIP admission tickets to the benefit are $1,000. General admission tickets are $600. (https://ccapinc.org/events/c-cap-annual-benefit-2019/)

Participating chefs and restaurants include:

Matthew Tiscornia, Abigail Kirsch

Jason Weiner and Alex Nieto, Almond

Markus Glocker, Bâtard

Floyd Cardoz, Bombay Bread

Daniel Boulud, Aaron Bludorn, Café Boulud

Bruno Bertin, Cuisine Solutions

Angie Rito, Scott Tacinelli, Don Angie

Ivy Stark, El Toro Blanco

Costas Spiliadis, Estiatorio Milos

Fortunato Nicotra, Felidia

Yvan Lemoine, Gitano, The Jungle Room

Alfred Portale, Gotham Bar and Grill

Michael Anthony, Gramercy Tavern

Miro Uskokovic, Gramercy Tavern

Manish Mehrotra, Indian Accent

Jonathan Waxman, JAMS

Maria Loi, Loi Estiatorio

Kyung Up Lim, Michael’s

Abram Bissell, The Modern

Matt Hoyle, Nobu 57

Bill Telepan, Oceana

Greg Baxtrom, Olmstead

Zene Flinn, Park Avenue Winter

Ashfer Biju, Perrine

Philippe Bertineau, The Polo Bar

Michael Lomonaco, Wayne Harley Brachman, Daniel Rutledge, Porter House

Marcus Samuelsson, Red Rooster Harlem and Marcus B&P

Jae Lee, Betty Peña, Rice & Gold

Sarabeth Levine, Sarabeth’s

Jeff Miller, Storico, Constellation Culinary Group

Bill Peet, Tavern on the Green

Sherry Yard and Greg Power, The Tuck Room

Suzanne Cupps, Untitled

Michael White, Arthur Lee, Vaucluse

(For further information visit www.ccapinc.org and follow C-CAP on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. Event hashtag: #ccapbenefit) Posted February 2, 2019.

LEONARD BERNSTEIN CENTENNIAL EXHIBIT AT LIBRARY FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS  Send This Review to a Friend

Memories are stirred dramatically at the just-opened “Leonard Bernstein at 100” exhibition at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center. The tribute continues through March 24, 2018, and music lovers will find much to enjoy when paying a visit. The renowned composer and conductor was born on August 25, 1918 in Lawrence, Massachusetts. He died on October 24, 1990.

Videos of Bernstein conducting are fascinating, and those chosen range from his younger years through his later triumphs. In addition, there are annotated Bernstein scores.

Also included is a collection of memorabilia harking back to his family, his growing up period and schooling. One can examine a report card from his days at Harvard (not particularly exceptional grades on that one), from which he graduated with honors.

Selections of Bernstein’s correspondence are included, and of special interest is a long letter that he wrote to his mother. An early family upright piano is on display, and there is his later concert piano. A formal outfit that he wore as conductor is shown, and there is even a collection of luggage that he carried on his world travels.

One sees posters of the musicals that he wrote during his multifaceted career that included composing for Broadway as well as opera. We also see evidence of his role as an educator and of his long association with Tanglewood.

One section is particularly intriguing—examples from a file that the FBI kept on him. In addition to the pages you can read, there is a whole stack of pages from that file. A controversy swirled around Bernstein when he hosted an event connected to the Black Panthers. Of course, that was just one of many instances of Bernstein demonstrating his social concerns. At the 40th anniversary of dropping the nuclear bombs on Japan, he conducted a “Journey for Peace” tour. When the Berlin Wall came down, he conducted “Berlin Celebration Concerts.”

There is a series of caricatures that the artist Al Hirschfeld drew of Bernstein, each an example of how Hirschfeld could capture the essence of his subject with a minimum of lines. Many photographs of Bernstein at various stages of his life and career are included.

One should take ample time for a visit as there is much to see, read and contemplate. On walking through the exhibition, one can get very nostalgic about what a great man Bernstein was in the world of music for so many of his extensive contributions and the stature that he achieved world-wide.

As a further celebration of his centennial the Library for the Performing Arts has scheduled a series of public events during December and in 2018. Examples: On Thursday, Dec. 21 at 6 p.m. there will be a screening of “On the Waterfront,” the only film for which Bernstein wrote a score; on Tuesday, Jan. 23, at 7 p.m. a program will be “Bernstein Family Memories,” with Bob Santelli, curator of the centennial exhibition, conversing with Bernstein family members and special guests.

Further information can be obtained online at nypl.org/lpa or by phoning 212-642-0142. Posted December 12, 2017.

ALBERT STADLER EXHIBIT DAZZLES AT BERRY CAMPBELL GALLERY  Send This Review to a Friend

Even before entering the Berry Campbell Gallery in Chelsea, one can see through the broad window paintings that glow with amazing use of color. They are the works of important artist Albert Stadler (1923-2000), honored with the current show that runs through December 22 at the gallery owned by Christine A. Berry and Martha Campbell. The exhibit is appropriately called “Albert Stadler—Studies in Color.”

Stadler, whose first solo exhibition was held in 1962 at Bennington College, is recognized for combining color and minimalist art, as exemplified in this collection. Some of the works on display, nearly all in acrylic on canvas, are attractively bold, while others are sensitively subtle.

In surveying his paintings, one can appreciate Stadler’s ability to blend a variety of colors with his abstract imagery. One favorite is “Twilight,” which he did in 1973. Another is “Wild Character,” painted in 1979. Meadowrise (1983) is another dazzler, as is “Exotic Night.” (1982).

Mari Stadler, who was married to the artist, has dedicatedly worked to keep his art in the forefront, and Valerie Stadler, his daughter, has directed a film, “Albert Stadler: Color,” which explores his achievements. The film includes comments by Mari Stadler, Christine Berry and Sanford Wurmfeld, artist and Professor Emeritus of Hunter College.

The Berry Campbell Gallery is located at 530 West 24th Street. Phone: 212-924-2178. Posted November 17, 2017.

C-CAP BENEFIT HONORING CHEF JOSÉ ANDRÉS RAISES MORE THAN ONE MILLION DOLLARS  Send This Review to a Friend

There is a distinction at a fund-raising event for C-CAP, the Careers through Culinary Arts Program, that doesn’t usually apply to other such events. One can actually see the organization’s results in play. Throughout the elaborate food-tasting at New York’s Pier 60, Chelsea Piers, on February 27, students who have benefited from the organization’s training program were graciously assisting.

On the way in I encountered a young woman who was helping to welcome the nearly 1000 guests attending, and when I inquired about her background, she enthusiastically told of having been given a C-CAP scholarship that enabled her to have lived in Paris and studied at the prestigious Le Cordon Bleu. The experience has already changed her life. (Before founding C-CAP, chef and author Richard Grausman, now C-CAP's Chairman Emeritus, represented Le Cordon Bleu in the United States.)

The honoree this year, José Andrés, has been lauded for his achievements as a culinary innovator, author, educator, TV personality, humanitarian and chef/owner of ThinkFoodGroup & minibar by José Andrés. Imposing and exuberant, Andrés in accepting the award spoke words of hope and encouragement to the assemblage. “We must be sure that we don’t leave anybody behind, ” he asserted, praising C-CAP for all it does. He said that by always pressing ahead a big difference can be made in so many lives.

The Honors Award to Andrés was presented by Chair Ken Himmel, President & CEO of Related Urban, C-CAP Board Co-Chair and chef Marcus Samuelsson, and Richard Grausman. During the evening the event honored Grausman in celebration of his 80th birthday, with the crowd joining to sing “Happy Birthday” to him. WCBS-TV News Anchorman Maurice DuBois was Master of Ceremonies. Sotheby’s auctioneer Eli Rodriquez conducted an auction of special attractions that helped raise the funds, and there was also a silent auction.

Speeches and ceremony aside, the special pleasure of attending is the opportunity to sample signature dishes from some of the most prominent restaurants and chefs in New York. The tables stretched across the room, the wine flowed and lines formed. I did my share of tasting, not everything of course, as the choices are too vast, although I talked to one woman who was on a personal mission to sample each available dish. I don’t know if she succeeded.

In my tour I found the grilled octopus with red wine, macerated onions, fresh herbs, lemon and oiive oil served by Loi Estiatorio excellent, and I chatted with owner Maria Loi, whom I know from having patronized her restaurant. Felidia served an intriguing shrimp with blood orange “agrodolce” with fennel, basil seeds and pistachio. Café Boulud was represented by smoked Alaskan salmon with horseradish yogurt, beets and pumpernickel. I liked Park Avenue Winter’s concoction of smoked mushrooms and Urbani Perigord truffle with hazelnuts on corn johnnycake.

There was Asiate’s fois gras royale with lychee and pumpkin seed crumble. I enjoyed Oceana’s swordfish paillard with Milanese salad. Almond served Moroccan-style lamb meatballs with salsa verde and smoked feta. The Tuck Room’s brioche-encrusted crab cake was superb. The Modern served gently seared prawns with brown butter and almonds. I could go on and on.

As for desserts, I liked Gramercy Tavern’s old fashioned coconut cake doughnuts with passion fruit glaze. Triple chocolate chocolate pudding was the seductive, rich offering of Sarabeth’s. Fusco delighted with tiramisu “ag2ffogato.”

The following is a list of participating chefs and restaurants: Philip DeMaiolo, Abigail Kirsch

Jason Weiner and Alex Nieto, Almond

Cyril Renaud, Asiate

Markus Glocker, Bâtard

Daniel Boulud, Aaron Bludorn, Cesar Gutierrez*, Café Boulud

Carla Hall, Carla Hall

Melissa Rodriguez, Del Posto

Fortunato Nicotra, Felidia

Scott Conant, Fusco

Alfred Portale, Gotham Bar and Grill

Miro Uskokovic, Gramercy Tavern

Manish Mehrotra, Indian Accent

Maria Loi, Loi Estiatorio

Kim Up Lim, Michael’s

Abram Bissell, The Modern

Matt Hoyle, Nobu 57

Bill Telepan, Oceana

Zene Flinn, Park Avenue Winter

Ashfer Biju, Perrine

Thomas Keller, Per Se

Philippe Bertineau, The Polo Bar

Michael Lomonaco and Wayne Harley Brachman, Porter House

Delfin Jaranilla, Quality Eats

Sarabeth Levine, Sarabeth’s

Marcus Samuelsson, Streetbird Rotisserie

Sherry Yard and Greg Power, The Tuck Room

José Andrés, ThinkFoodGroup

Thomas Chen, Tuome

Yvan Lemoine*, Union Fare

Chris Santos, Vandal

Michael White, Vaucluse

*C-CAP Alum

(For more information visit www.ccapinc.org; follow C-CAP on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @CCAPINC )

C-CAP BENEFIT TO HONOR CHEF AND CULINARY EXPERT JOSÉ ANDRÉS  Send This Review to a Friend

I’ve been writing about the Careers through Culinary Arts Program (C-CAP) ever since 1990 when the non-profit organization was founded by culinary educator and cookbook author Richard Grausman, who had what has proven to be a great idea and pursued it with dedication and foresight. I attended award ceremonies that brought tears to my eyes as inner city high school students movingly accepted scholarships presented by Grausman on behalf of C-CAP—scholarships that would change their lives and open up job opportunities.

I have continued to write about C-CAP tasting benefits through the years chaired by Grausman (now Chairman Emeritus) and have reported on the remarkable $53 million in scholarships and the inspiring stories of students who have gone on to earn distinction in the food service world and bear out the importance of the C-CAP mission. I have watched TV segments of Grausman conducting high school cooking competitions and the excitement involved.

Now it is once again time for a C-CAP food tasting benefit. This year the honoree will be José Andrés, internationally recognized culinary innovator, author, educator, television personality, humanitarian, and chef/owner of ThinkFoodGroup & minibar by José Andrés. The annual culinary event will take place on Tuesday, February 27, 2018 from 5:45-9:00 p.m. at Pier Sixty, Chelsea Piers, the long-time benefit venue. Elior North America is the lead sponsor of the event, which will feature culinary tastings prepared by over 30 of the city’s noted chefs, including Chef Chair and C-CAP Board Co-Chair Marcus Samuelsson and Michelin Star Chefs José Andrés, Abram Bissel, Daniel Boulud, Markus Glocker, Alfred Portale, Thomas Keller, and Michael White, as well as C-CAP alumni Cesar Gutierrez from Café Boulud and Yvan Lemoine from Union Fare. Assisting the chefs will be more than 60 New York City C-CAP high school students and alumni.

“C-CAP changes lives by arming disadvantaged high school students with the skills they need to succeed in the culinary arts,” says Marcus Samuelsson. “C-CAP helps thousands of qualified students across the country through education and career placement opportunities. As a chef and longtime supporter of C-CAP’s work, I have seen first-hand how this program benefits its remarkable students and the industry’s growing demand for skilled talent. C-CAP’s Benefit makes a huge difference in the lives of so many students.”

The Chair for this year’s benefit is Kenneth A. Himmel, President & CEO of Related Urban. “We are thrilled to honor José Andrés for his remarkable contributions to the industry, for making the world a better place, and for his commitment to culinary innovation,” says Himmel.

José Andrés was named one of Time’s “100 Most Influential People” and “Outstanding Chef” by the James Beard Foundation. A pioneer of Spanish tapas in the United States, he is known for his avant-garde cuisine and his award-winning group of 28 restaurants throughout the country and beyond. His innovative minibar by José Andrés earned two Michelin stars and with that, José is the only chef globally that has both a two-star Michelin restaurant and four Bib Gourmands. Andrés’ work has earned numerous awards including the 2015 National Humanities Medal, one of 12 distinguished recipients of the award from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

WCBS-TV News Anchorman Maurice DuBois will be the Master of Ceremonies. The event is coordinated by Gourmet Advisory Services; Harriette Rose Katz will be overseeing the chefs. The featured C-CAP alumni speaker will be Gabrielle Calle, who received C-CAP scholarships to attend the Culinary Institute of America and to study and work in Madrid. She has advanced in her career at such venues as Gotham Bar & Grill and Union Square Cafe, and she is currently sous chef at Pier Sixty.

Past recipients of the C-CAP Honors Award include: Michael Anthony, Daniel Humm, Richard Parsons & Alexander Smalls, Michael White, Tony May, Michael McCarty, Michael Lomonaco, Marcus Samuelsson, Drew Nieporent, Alfred Portale, Lidia Bastianich, Thomas Keller, Charlie Palmer, Danny Meyer & Michael Romano, Daniel Boulud, Jacques Pepin, Egidiana & Sirio Maccioni, Nina & Tim Zagat, and Saul Zabar & Stanley Zabar.

The C-CAP Benefit is open to the public. VIP Admission Tickets are $1,000 and include a signed cookbook from a celebrity chef. General admission tickets are $600 (limited availability).

Participating chefs and restaurants include:

Philip DeMaiolo, Abigail Kirsch

Jason Weiner and Alex Nieto, Almond

Cyril Renaud, Asiate

Markus Glocker, Bâtard

Daniel Boulud, Aaron Bludorn, Cesar Gutierrez*, Café Boulud

Carla Hall, Carla Hall

Melissa Rodriguez, Del Posto

Fortunato Nicotra, Felidia

Scott Conant, Fusco

Alfred Portale, Gotham Bar and Grill

Miro Uskokovic, Gramercy Tavern

Manish Mehrotra, Indian Accent

Maria Loi, Loi Estiatorio

Kim Up Lim, Michael’s

Abram Bissell, The Modern

Matt Hoyle, Nobu 57

Bill Telepan, Oceana

Zene Flinn, Park Avenue Winter

Ashfer Biju, Perrine

Thomas Keller, Per Se

Philippe Bertineau, The Polo Bar

Michael Lomonaco and Wayne Harley Brachman, Porter House

Delfin Jaranilla, Quality Eats

Sarabeth Levine, Sarabeth’s

Marcus Samuelsson, Streetbird Rotisserie

Sherry Yard and Greg Power, The Tuck Room

José Andrés, ThinkFoodGroup

Thomas Chen, Tuome

Yvan Lemoine*, Union Fare

Chris Santos, Vandal

Michael White, Vaucluse

*C-CAP Alum

(For more information visit www.ccapinc.org; follow C-CAP on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @CCAPINC ; Event hashtag: #ccapbenefit.)

Posted January 9, 2018.

EDVARD MUNCH'S MOODY MASTERWORKS  Send This Review to a Friend

Years ago in Oslo I watched a group of very young students sitting around on the floor in front of “The Scream” with a teacher talking to them about the painting. I have occasionally wondered what those children were making of Munch’s cry of despair. There is only a lithograph of “The Scream” in the current reassessment of Munch’s career on display at The Met Breuer (November 15-February 4, 2018), but there are 42 other works by the artist, including some being seen in the United States for the first time. The current show is titled “Edvard Munch: Between the Clock and the Bed.”

Munch (1863-1944) expressed himself with many paintings that reflected a dark vision. One has to hunt to find any that one might call optimistic. There are two paintings called “Starry Night,” and one has a happy glow, while the other, despite the title, is quite dark. One of the cheerful works in the exhibit is the colorful “The Dance of Life.”

There are 16 self-portraits in the collection, and they have in common a severity of one sort or another. There is a unique one that shows Munch in a stance that comes across as delightfully assertive. There is, of course, the self-portrait of Munch in the painting that gives the exhibition its title, “Self Portrait Between the Clock and the Bed,” with Munch standing stiffly in the middle.

One especially impressive painting, “Jealousy,” shows a couple embracing in the background, while in the foreground a man looks dramatically upset, with the presumtiom that he is jealous of his wife with another man.

Works being shown in the U.S. for the first time include “Lady in Black,” “Puberty,” “Jealousy,” “Death Struggle,” “Man With Bronchitis,” “Self-Portrait with Hands in Pockets” and “Ashes.”

Munch was deeply sadden and haunted by the death of his sister Sophie, and several paintings were inspired by his grief, as in “The Sick Child.”

Whatever his subject, the paintings chosen display the individual styles of Munch as his career proceeded and also reflect his often pessimistic view of life, undoubtedly fueled by his personal psychological problems. This is an excellent opportunity to survey examples of what makes Munch’s work so special. At the Met Breuer, 945 Madison Avenue (at 75th Street). Phone: 212-923-3700. Posted November 15, 2017.

SYLVIA PLATH EXHIBIT IMPRESSIVE AT GROLIER CLUB  Send This Review to a Friend

A striking exhibition illuminating the life and work of the late poet and writer Sylvia Plath has been assembled at the Grolier Club by noted scholar and author Judith G. Raymo. Titled “This is the Light of the Mind,” it opened on September 19 and continues through November 4, 2017.

The tribute to the renowned Plath, who committed suicide in 1963 at the age of 30, is mostly from the personal Plath collection of Raymo, who has annotated in detail various examples of Plath’s writing, history and personal correspondence. On surveying the assemblage one can get a firm impression of Plath’s professional and personal life, and come away with a feeling of the loss suffered when her career was tragically so short lived.

In the catalogue published in connection with the exhibit, Raymo notes: “I have been collecting editions of the works of the poet and writer Sylvia Plath for the past 25 years. My early interest was sparked by the posthumous publication of her extraordinary book of poems, ‘Ariel” (1965). Plath and I were both undergraduates who majored in English literature at Smith College in the 1950s. As I began to collect her works in earnest and to read many accounts of her life, I reflected on the experiences of young women who came of age in post-World War II society as we sought to negotiate often-conflicting expectations and challenges of mid-twentieth-century culture.

“We know the many details of Plath’s daily existence from her remarkably candid journals, in which she recorded her thoughts, experiences, and drafts of her poetry and fiction from the age of eleven. When read in tandem with her correspondence to her mother, her friends and her family, these documents provide us with an abundant record of a writer’s interior and private life and its many turning points.”

Raymo notes that “Plath’s poems and stories have been translated into more than thirty languages” and that “fictionalized versions of Plath’s life have been made into films, plays, novels and an Italian opera. ‘The Bell Jar’ regularly appears on high school reading lists and ‘Ariel” is now required reading in many gender studies courses. In 2010, Plath was inducted into Poet’s Corner in the Cathedral of St. John the Divine. And in April, 2012, she was one of ten American poets honored with his or her image on a U.S. postage stamp.”

Attending the opening of the exhibition, I was particularly struck by the details Raymo provided in her meticulous descriptions of the material on display. One can spend considerable, pleasurable time reading the examples of poems and correspondence, and the explanations that accompany them. The exhibit is on the second floor of the Grolier Club, 47 East 60th Street. Posted September 24, 2017.

  

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